5 signs you need to change your relationship with food

5 signs you need to change your relationship with food
5 signs you need to change your relationship with food
Anonim

Are you following your diet, up to date with the latest nutritional innovations, but dissatisfied with your body and feel a breakdown? You may have an eating disorder.

5 signs it's time to change your relationship with food

How do you know if your relationship with food is broken?

1. YOU DON'T REMEMBER THE LAST TIME YOU FELT HUNGRY

You eat when you're sad or happy, pissed off at a clueless co-worker, or worried about why your kid hasn't returned from school yet, your friends are calling you out for lunch, or your husband is asking you to join you for dinner. There can be a lot of reasons to eat, but when you “sucked in the pit of your stomach” or rumbled in your stomach, you can’t remember.

WHAT IS THIS TALKING ABOUT?

Food is your way of dealing with emotions. It helps for the time being, but overweight is almost guaranteed. Because "emotional eaters" (as psychologists call them) constantly eat more than their body needs.

2. YOU ARE TRYING TO EAT EXCLUSIVELY RIGHT

You have read all the articles about he althy eating, know by heart the glycemic index of most foods and are absolutely sure that eclairs are second only to nuclear weapons in their harmfulness. Not so long ago, psychologists came up with a new term "orthorexia" - this obsession with the idea of ​​\u200b\u200bproper nutrition. The search for the safest products becomes the main life goal for an orthorectist, and other areas of life (home - family - work - hobbies) are gradually losing their significance.

WHAT IS THIS TALKING ABOUT?

Food for you is a way to control your life, which seems very dangerous to you. The orthorectic often doesn't feel the tremendous anxiety that accompanies him all the time (because he's busy calculating the protein-carbohydrate proportions in the new super-he althy product "cloudberry-flavoured emulsified algae"), but it pretty much undermines his he alth.

3. YOU ARE A WALKING ENCYCLOPEDIA OF DIET

You have tried 279 diets in total, and 348 more are waiting in the wings. You drank cabbage juice, ate cayenne pepper, and your husband took away your tapeworm the day before yesterday. Almost every diet ends with a breakdown, guilt and the search for a new miracle food system. You are also secretly saving money for stomach reduction surgery.

WHAT IS THIS TALKING ABOUT?

There is an old joke about a man who lost his wallet in the bushes, but is looking for it under a lamp, because it is lighter there. Diets do not work for one simple reason - you need to look for the cause of dissatisfaction with your own life not in numbers on the scales, but in the depths of your inner world. The idea of ​​"now I'll lose weight and life will get better" is very attractive - and just as unpromising.

4. YOU ARE VERY ASHALED WITH YOURSELF

For your body that doesn't look like the pictures in the magazines (that's why you can't go to the gym because everyone will see how you look). For the numbers in the size of your clothes (so shopping becomes a torment). For what you eat at all (that's why you prefer to do it alone). You hate your reflection (and "fat pig" is the most endearing thing you can say to yourself) and regularly overeat. Why hate yourself even more.

WHAT IS THIS TALKING ABOUT?

It seems like when you were little, you had an extremely hurtful, incredibly humiliating and devastating experience of being rejected by loved ones. Behind every story of a person suffering from compulsive overeating, there are childhood experiences of their own uselessness, worthlessness, wrongness and disgust. And with the help of food, you habitually try to shut your mouth and drown out emotional pain.

5. YOU ARE FLASHING

Even as a teenager, you started stocking up on sweets and chips. Now you have fits where you can eat two cakes, a pack of brownies and four chocolates at a time. And during this attack, you can not control yourself, and everything ends with a feeling of nausea, pain in the stomach, severe heaviness and self-loathing. Describing your condition, we can say that you "eat not in yourself." Attacks usually occur in the evening, and the next morning you can not even take a sip of tea.

WHAT IS THIS TALKING ABOUT?

Specialists in eating behavior call such people bingers (from the English binge - an attack). As a rule, these are victims of parental prohibitions. Mom (of course, with the best of intentions) kept telling her teenage daughter that it would not hurt her to lose weight, control herself, limit starchy foods, run in the morning and not dishonor her family. The daughter grows up, and the protest against the prohibitions, along with dissatisfaction with herself, persists and manifests itself in bouts of gluttony.

What to do with all this? Unfortunately, few people manage to cope alone. But in any case, you need to start with a change in attitude towards yourself. The “Time to pick up that cow” attitude will eventually lead to weight gain again. Relationships with food can only be established through gentle, sincere and boundless love for yourself.

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