Antibacterial soap does not kill germs. Proven by scientists

Antibacterial soap does not kill germs. Proven by scientists
Antibacterial soap does not kill germs. Proven by scientists
Anonim

New study on antibacterial soap reveals years of consumer swindle.

Antibacterial soap does not kill germs. Proven by scientists

Is there a better antibacterial soap

So, antibacterial soap designed to protect you from germs turned out to be a soap bubble. It doesn't kill germs, it just washes them off your hands, and it doesn't do it any better than any other soap.

In September 2015, a study by scientists from Korea University was published in the journal Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. They compared regular soap and antibacterial soap on 20 strains of bacteria, including Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria.

Researchers exposed the bacteria to a 20-second exposure to regular soap and antibacterial soap with a concentration of triclosan 0.3% (this is the maximum amount of triclosan allowed for use in soap). The exposure was carried out at temperatures of 20 and 40 degrees Celsius, that is, the conditions of ordinary hand washing were experimentally reproduced.

No difference.

But maybe you just don't wash your hands long enough? Scientists have tested this hypothesis. And yes, natural antibacterial soap does kill bacteria. With one caveat: after 9 hours of continuous exposure. Not a good idea to spend the whole day in the toilet with soapy hands, is it?

To make sure they didn't really miss anything, the researchers went on a field experiment. They asked 16 volunteers to wash their hands for 30 seconds in warm water. After that, the number of remaining bacteria was determined.

No difference.

"This study showed that the presence of antiseptic ingredients in soap, in this case triclosan, does not increase the effectiveness of handwashing," said Min-Sook Ri, author of the study, an expert in food biology at Korea University. “If a manufacturer takes the liberty of advertising the antiseptic properties of their product, they should first conduct a scientific study and provide proven evidence for these properties.”

Antibacterial soap is not the first time it came under fire. So, back in December 2013, the FDA (Food and Drug Administration in the United States) required manufacturers to confirm the safety and effectiveness of their products.

The fact is that it was found that the active substance triclosan can cause toxic damage to the liver, respiratory tract and thyroid dysfunction.

Therefore, it makes no sense to overpay for the poison in the soap, which harms you more than the germs for which it is intended.

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